lunes, noviembre 23, 2020
More

    The Grandmothers of Plaza Olvera

    “It’s a privilege to be a grandmother and great-grandmother,” shouts Rosa Ayala. “I became a citizen, so I could vote… but more importantly, our youth are the future and we must protect them!”

    Ayala speaks from a podium placed in the patio of Our Lady of Los Angeles Church, “Nuestra Señora Reina de Los Angeles”  in Placita Olvera in downtown Los Angeles.

    “They should go and study, so they don’t end up like me, cleaning offices!”

    The abuela speaks to the congregation as the first Mass ends and people are leaving the church.  It’s Sunday, and together with other abuelitas she is here to participate in voter registration before the November 2nd election.

    “Blessed be the Lord for each and every one of our young people and because we are a nation of warriors.”  She ends her speech and those around her cheer.  Axel Caballero, an organizer for Cuentame, takes me to the abuelitas.   They sit at a table that resembles one in a precinct, and wait for the community members to finish their prayers so they can offer to register them to vote.  A couple of laptop computers sit in front of them, facing the crowd, for online registration–“But we can register them by hand,” says one of them.  It’s easy, says Caballero and laughs.  Even an abuela can do it.”

    The abuelas include Rosa Rodríguez, Guadalupe Díaz, Carmen Reyes, Rosa Ayala and Amalia González and her husband Lorenzo.  They all wear t-shirts saying “Cuéntame” in large letters.  “This is,” explains Caballero, “an interactive community of Latinos, for Latinos and the public in general.”

    Cuéntame has a double meaning, including “Count Me In” and “Tell Me;” as in, “Tell me a story.”  Founded by Caballero and Ofelia Yáñez with support from Brave Film Foundation, its main presence is on the Internet, where its Facebook page has garnered an amazing 43,000 fans after only a few months.   Today, however, Cuentame staff is here in person and has brought representatives from a variety of groups and organizations who also want to mobilize the community.  Among them, Dale Walker and Marcos Oliva, two of the founders of the group Basta that seeks to fight corruption in the city of Bell and promote the recall of the members of Bell’s city council.  Both are young, idealistic and enthusiastic.

    La gente de Cuentame

    “We have enough votes to launch the recall,” says Walker, and they laugh, not sure whether they should declare this yet.  I notice Jesus from Voto Latino 2010, founded by actress Rosario Dawson and others.  Their posters read “United We Win” in English.  The heat is scorching, and those offering voter registration complete with pushcarts selling cold drinks and bacon-wrapped hot dogs.

    The Grandmothers of Plaza Olvera belong to SEIU local 1877, the janitors’ union. The group represents upwards of 25,000 janitors in California and is headed by Mike Garcia, who makes a passionate appeal to those assembled to register and vote.  “The Latino vote is crucial,” he tells me.  “Whoever wants to win this election needs around 4.6 million votes, and Latinos are 3.4 million.”

    Etelvina Villalobos, a Salvadoran activist, is another member of the group.  “I am a minister officiating in this church,” she announces, repeating the call for civic involvement.  She tells me that during the Mass she will announce the presence of the Cuentame people outside the church.

    Like the Grandmothers of Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, the Grandmothers of Plaza Olvera are answering the call because they have no other choice.   However, they are united not by unending suffering because their sons and grandsons have been disappeared, but, instead, by the hope that members of the community will register to vote and participate in the political process.

    “I still clean offices there, in your newspaper,” Rosa tells me Rosa. “We are the people.”

    People begin to leave as others arrive for the next Mass.  Soon all the chairs are taken by young people and also, more than once, by another abuelita who answers the call by registering to vote.

    Gabriel Lerner
    Gabriel Lernerhttps://hispanicla.com
    Editor en jefe del diario La Opinión en Los Angeles. Fundador y co-editor de HispanicLA. Nació en Buenos Aires, Argentina, vivió en Israel y reside en Los Ángeles, California desde 1989. Es periodista, bloguero, poeta, novelista y cuentista. Fue director editorial de Huffington Post Voces entre 2011 y 2014 y anteriormente editor de noticias, también para La Opinión.

    Notas relacionadas

    La frágil democracia estadounidense

    Donald Trump insiste en no reconocer su derrota, enfrascándose en una especie de golpe de estado en cámara lenta y a plena luz del día.

    Venezuela: ex viceministro Villegas en el Fogón de Hispanic LA (VIDEO)...

    Ex viceministro y embajador venezolano, la situación post-electoral en Estados Unidos y reportes sobre el COVID-19 desde Argentina, El Salvador, México, EE.UU. y Canadá en el Fogón del 21 de noviembre.

    HispanicLA apoya  a Xavier Becerra para secretario de Justicia

    Hispanic LA le pide al presidente electo Joe Biden que elija a Xavier Becerra como el próximo secretario de Justicia de Estados Unidos

    2 COMENTARIOS

    DEJA UNA RESPUESTA

    Por favor ingrese su comentario!
    Por favor ingrese su nombre aquí

    13 + uno =

    Este sitio usa Akismet para reducir el spam. Aprende cómo se procesan los datos de tus comentarios.

    Lo más reciente

    La frágil democracia estadounidense

    Donald Trump insiste en no reconocer su derrota, enfrascándose en una especie de golpe de estado en cámara lenta y a plena luz del día.

    Venezuela: ex viceministro Villegas en el Fogón de Hispanic LA (VIDEO)

    Ex viceministro y embajador venezolano, la situación post-electoral en Estados Unidos y reportes sobre el COVID-19 desde Argentina, El Salvador, México, EE.UU. y Canadá en el Fogón del 21 de noviembre.

    HispanicLA apoya  a Xavier Becerra para secretario de Justicia

    Hispanic LA le pide al presidente electo Joe Biden que elija a Xavier Becerra como el próximo secretario de Justicia de Estados Unidos

    Las inscripciones a los estudios clínicos de la vacuna contra el COVID-19 a cargo de UCLA y del Instituto Lundquist está...

    Las inscripciones a los estudios clínicos de la vacuna contra el COVID-19 a cargo de UCLA y del Instituto Lundquist están abiertas en Los Ángeles

    En estas elecciones se plasmó la identidad latina

    Los latinos están estableciendo su identidad como parte del pueblo estadounidense y en contra de una cultura de opresión, odio, racismo y violencia que los rechaza. Veremos una definición más nítida de la identidad latina tomando forma.

    Estamos en Facebook y Twitter

    4,575FansMe gusta
    1,973SeguidoresSeguir

    Los 5 populares de la semana

    Cuatro poemas de la revolución mexicana

    Pablo Neruda: A Zapata; Salvador Novo: Del pasado remoto; Salvador Novo: Del pasado remoto; Manuel Maples Arce: Vrbe, superpoema bolchevique en 5 cantos

    Jacques Mesrine: Contigo en el infierno

    Jacques Mesrine, hijo de un industrial parisino, decidió convertirse a los 23 años en un asesino. “Uno de esos salvajes animales criminales que matan a sangre fría, una criatura de carne y hueso que no siente el menor remordimiento”

    HispanicLA apoya  a Xavier Becerra para secretario de Justicia

    Hispanic LA le pide al presidente electo Joe Biden que elija a Xavier Becerra como el próximo secretario de Justicia de Estados Unidos

    Trump y los evangélicos blancos: el porqué de tanta hipocresía religiosa

    Detrás de todos los argumentos, del encubrimiento de la mentira, la estrategia de la derecha conservadora es controlar el sistema judicial de Estados Unidos. Específicamente tomar control de la Corte Suprema de Justicia y los circuitos judiciales federales. Trump es solo un instrumento de utilidad

    El Cuervo de Edgar Allan Poe, traducción de Julio Cortázar

    “Es —dije musitando— un visitante tocando quedo a la puerta de mi cuarto. Eso es todo, y nada más.”